20 Awesome Beagle Mix: Complete Guide to Beagle Cross Breeds

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The Beagle is one of the most easily recognized and best-loved dog breeds in the USA. In fact, Beagle purebreds are the 6th most popular breed of dog in America. This is largely due to their easy-going nature, intelligence and energy.

Have you considered one of the many Beagle mixes though? Some of the most popular include the Beagle Shepherd and the Poogle or the Jackabee.

You may wonder – Aren’t Crossbreeds just mongrels or mutts? This is a contentious issue. Breeders explain that the difference is that a crossbreed is a deliberately designed cross with two carefully chosen purebred parents. Mutts, or mongrels, are accidental crosses with unknown lineage, possibly including several different breeds.

One of the benefits of crossbreeding is that you are likely to reduce the likelihood of hereditary diseases common in either breed, increasing the dog’s lifespan along the way. One of the negatives is that because the genetic information is randomly mixed, you never quite know which characteristics of each breed are going to be expressed – it’s a bit of a lucky dip!

In this article we’ll take you through the key information about the main crossbreed Beagles, to help you decide if one of them will be right for you.

Things to Consider when Looking at Beagle Cross Breeds

As with any dog, it’s very important to do your research before you go ahead. This is even more important with a crossbreed as you’ll need to look into the background of both parents and their breed characteristics. The puppy may inherit characteristics from either parent, and it won’t always be obvious in puppy-hood.

In addition to researching the breeds of both parents and the characteristics of crossbreeds, you should look at the breeder, meet both parent dogs and watch how the pups in the litter interact with one another. You will be inviting this dog to be part of your family, and it will be changing as it grows. It’s important not to make your selection based on looks as a puppy!

Things you may wish to consider:

  • Family friendly – Beagles are very affectionate, intelligent and pleasant to be around, so most of these mixed breeds are generally easy-going. However, you do need to think about what the other breed brings to the table – a jealous dog or one with a bossy, herding instinct may not be great with young children, or a dog with high prey drive might cause issues amongst other pets.
  • Health – some breeds are more prone to certain health issues and while those are likely to be reduced in a crossbreed, you should definitely be aware of them so you can ask for relevant health screens to be carried out on parents and on puppies if necessary. This is particularly the case if both parent breeds are susceptible to the same conditions.
  • Energy levels – Beagles were bred as hunting dogs, so require plenty of physical activity. Some of the characteristics of the other breed they are crossed with may either enhance this need or reduce it slightly. It’s important to think about whether you live an active lifestyle to help you select the right dog.

Now that we’ve talked about what to think about when deciding which Beagle cross breed you might choose, let’s find out more about the mixes. 

As Beagle Mixes have, by definition, got 50% Beagle genetic information, it would be as well to give some general information about the pure-breed Beagle here, and then we can look at what the other half of the equation looks like in each case, and what that means for the resulting mix.

The Beagle harks back long before the hunting hounds used in England in the Middle Ages, where he was prized as a “foot-hound” – one which could be used when hunting on foot. Arriving in America after the Civil War, he became a firm favorite with rabbit hunters. Now one of the most popular dog breeds in America, the Beagle is a firm favorite with families.

In terms of personality, the Beagle brings personality, energy and comedy. It loves to spend time with the family, but also requires mental and physical stimulation. If confined alone in a kitchen or yard, a Beagle will use his considerable problem-solving skills to dig, climb or otherwise escape.

The Beagle generally stands around 13” – 15” in height and weighs between 15 and 30 lb. It has long, floppy ears, a long tail and sleep coat that generally comes in various shades from yellow through red/brown, combined with white.

There are some health issues in the Beagle population, such as patellar luxation (dislocating kneecaps), inherited eye diseases and some other conditions such as epilepsy and hypothyroidism.

Beagle Mix Dog Breeds

#1 – Cheagle – Chihuahua / Beagle mix

Cheagle - Chihuahua Cheagle  Beagle mix

The Cheagle is another name (and much easier to spell!) for the Chihuahua / Beagle mix. As the Chihuahua is much smaller than the Beagle, the result is a small dog with heaps of personality.

So, let’s find out more about the Chihuahua part of this combination:

Chihuahuas are depicted in ancient artefacts all over the world, indicating not only that it’s been around a long time, but also that it has always been very popular! It is the National Dog of Mexico and is believed to have been developed by the Aztecs.

Interestingly, Chihuahuas and Beagles have quite different personality traits, and of course it’s a bit of a lottery knowing which ones will be expressed in the crossbreed.

Beagle’s are loving and affectionate people-pleasers, quick to learn and easy to train, though he does have a high prey drive and can be quite vocal as he chases. 

The Chihuahua is a bit more of a free-thinker. Willing to learn or follow commands only if it suits them, the Chihuahua also likes to be the center of attention and does not want to share your affections with children or other pets.

The Cheagle, then will be a mix of these two personalities. It’s certain they will adore you and be very devoted, but the rest is up to chance and a lot of early socialization and training.

Regarding appearance, your Cheagle could be anywhere between 5 and 15 inches tall and weigh between 6 and 30 pounds. Other than that, the appearance could be closer to one or the other or a complete mix. Some Chihuahuas have long hair, and if your Cheagle inherits this, they will need grooming more often than if it inherits short hair. 

As both Chihuahuas and Beagles are prone to eye disease and patellar luxation, it is important to ensure the parents have been screened for these. You should also research health issues suffered by both breeds in the mix, to screen or keep an eye out for them.

As a smaller dog, your Cheagle will be content with a good half hour of exercise every day and will also enjoy lots of games with you.

#2 – Jackabee – Jack Russel / Beagle mix

Jackabee - Jack Russel  Beagle mix

The Jack Russel / Beagle Mix is a really popular crossbreed, though there is no consistency with the name – it can be Jackabee, Jack a bee or Jack a Bea or any other similar variation.

The Jack Russel adds an interesting edge to the Beagle characteristics. Another hunting dog from England, the Jack Russel is an intelligent and personable little dog. Great with children and other dogs, you need to watch them with smaller pets due to their hunting instincts.

So, what does this mean for the Jackabee?

Well, as always with a crossbreed, the mix of characteristics from the parents is unpredictable and can even differ within the litter. In general, the Jackabee is between 14 and 30 pounds and from 12” – 15” tall. They have floppy ears and wide eyes and some very interesting color patterns. Both parent breeds shed, so you should expect a bit of fluff around the place, and to brush his coat a couple of times a week.

There are some health issues from the Jack Russell breed, such as inherited eye diseases and knee problems, and since these are both also common in Beagles, it would be important that both parent dogs are screened for these before being bred. The likely lifespan of a Jackabee would be between 10 and 16 years.

Fun and cute with bags of personality, intelligence and curiosity, you will never be bored with a Jackabee around. Their natural hunting instincts are tempered by an easy going, playful nature, but you do need to be careful with them around smaller pets.

Because both parent breeds are bred for hunting, the Jackabee will need a lot of exercise and mental stimulation to prevent him from becoming destructive. A good walk of around an hour every day, and plenty of playtime at home is important. As they have a strong “prey drive” you’ll have to have a very strong recall before you let him off the leash.

#3 – Beagle Shepherd – Beagle / German Shepherd mix

German Shepherd Beagle mix

Unsurprisingly, when you mix two such popular breeds as the German Shepherd and the Beagle, this cross breed has been growing in popularity.

The German Shepherd originated from herding dogs across Europe. They are large, ranging from 22-26 inches in height and from 50 to 90 pounds in weight. As a result, the Beagle Shepherd could be anywhere from 13 to 26 inches tall and anything from 20 to 90 pounds in weight – though usually they are somewhere in the middle rather than at the extremes. 

Since both breeds have medium length, thick coats, the Beagle Shepherd has inherited this, though fur may be thicker around the neck and the back of the legs, like their German Shepherd parent. Coat colors are very varied and may or may not be a double coat.

The personalities of the two breeds are quite distinct, so apart from expecting a Beagle Shepherd to be confident, quirky, intelligent and good with children, the rest could be any of the following:

  • Excitable and playful like a Beagle
  • Hard working and obedient like a German Shepherd.
  • Protective over their territory like a German Shepherd.

Both parent breeds are active dogs, bred for working or hunting. As a result, the crossbreed will certainly need plenty of exercise. At least an hour every day, adding up to twelve miles in the course of the week is needed, as well as a variety of activities for mental stimulation. The Beagle Shepherd will probably have a strong scent drive, so will need to be kept on a leash.

In terms of health, you’ll need to be very aware of, and screen the parents if possible, hip dysplasia, epilepsy and degenerative myelopathy, as these conditions are known to affect both Beagles and German Shepherds.

#4 – Boggle – Boxer / Beagle Mix

Boggle - Boxer Beagle mix

The Boxer and Beagle mix is a firm favorite, known variously as the Boggle, the Bogle or the Boxel. It’s often a surprising combination, as the Boxer is nowhere near as popular as the Beagle, having earned himself a reputation for aggression. Let’s find out more about the mix of these two breeds.

The Boxer can be traced back thousands of years to the Assyrian Empire War dogs, but more recently they were refined in Germany. They were used for hunting bears, boar and other large animals. As hunting fell out of favor, breeding programs leant towards more family friendly dogs.

The combination of the two breeds leads to a dog that is both playful and loyal. The Bogle tends to be great with kids, full of energy and never happier than when hanging out with his family. He will need plenty of exercise and consistent training, and other sports such as flyball may also be worth looking into to stretch his faculties and burn some energy.

The Bogle pup will be somewhere between 23 and 30 inches tall, inheriting more height from the Boxer, and will weigh between 50 and 60 pounds. It will have a short coat which sheds seasonally. You can expect 12-15 years of love from this dog, though of course you should carry out appropriate health checks on the parents and the pup.

#5 – Poogle – Poodle / Beagle Mix

Poogle - Poodle Beagle mix

The Poodle crossed with the Beagle makes for an adorable, intelligent and playful dog. Variously called the Poogle, the Beaglepoo, the Beagledoodle, the Beapoo or the Poogle, this dog has almost as many names as possible appearance variations.

With the tightly curled, fast-growing, hypoallergenic hair of a Poodle, or the sleek, shedding hair of the Beagle, the Poogle could be closer to one parent or another or somewhere in between, and you may not actually have a clear picture of what they are going to look like until they reach adulthood. It is likely to be 10-15 inches tall and 20-30 pounds.

In terms of character, the Poodle is intelligent and loves to learn. Combine this with the playfulness and fun-loving character of a Beagle and you get a family-friendly, energetic dog that needs to be exercised for at least thirty minutes every day.

Unfortunately, both Beagle and Poodle are prone to the same set of diseases including luxating patellas (dislocating kneecaps), epilepsy, hypothyroidism and eye disorders, so it’s really important to check into the parent’s health screening history.

#6 – Beagador – Beagle / Labrador Mix

Beagador Beagle / Labrador Mix

A friendly and energetic combination of beagle and Labrador Retriever, the Beagador is a popular crossbreed, unsurprising since the Labrador is the most popular breed in America and the Beagle comes in not far behind at number six.

Generally weighing between 25 and 45 pounds and growing to between 13 and 22 inches, it’s a middle-sized dog and will probably have a short, dense double coat, which may be waterproof like a Labrador coat. Keep a watch on their diet, as both parent breeds are prone to excessive weight gain which will increase the likelihood of some health issues.

Since both Beagle and Labrador are friendly and inquisitive, it’s highly likely that your Beagador will be both of these. They are also likely to be somewhat boisterous but very easy to train. You should not leave the Beagador alone for long periods as he will prefer to be with you and will voice his frustration with loud howling.

The two crucial things that you can do to prevent any behavior issues with your Beagador will be to thoroughly socialize as a puppy, and to ensure he gets enough exercise and stimulation. Swimming is something to consider, as Labradors are happy in the water, and often used as water rescue dogs.

Health issues to watch out for from the Labrador side include elbow and hip dysplasia, hereditary myopathy and heart diseases. From the Beagle side you should watch for epilepsy, hypothyroidism and luxating patella. You should also screen for eye issues, which affect both breeds. Your Beagador should live for 10-15 years.

In general, this is a wonderful crossbreed, suitable as family pets and providing many years of fun and love. It will be happiest roaming the countryside on a family adventure.

#7 – Beagi – Beagle / Corgi mix

Beagi Beagle / Corgi mix

This mixture of Beagle and Corgi makes for a very cute looking dog with a totally adorable temperament. The Beagi is an intelligent and playful dog with an affectionate personality.

Let’s see where these characteristics come from.

There are actually two breeds of Corgi: the Pembroke Welsh Corgi and the Cardigan Welsh Corgi. They have been around since the 1800s and were just one breed until the 1800s. They’ve always been a symbol of affluence and the Queen of England has owned Corgis all her life. 

Despite being cherished by the rich and powerful, the Corgi is also a working dog, bred to herd livestock. Many Corgis still maintain the instinct to herd, which is often passed down to their crossbreed offspring, you may well notice the Corgi herding your family and keeping you all together on a walk.

While the Beagi is likely to be affectionate and playful, especially from the Beagle side, it’s worth noting that he will also have the herding instinct and a bossy nature of the Corgi. It might be best to wait until your children are a little bit older before adding a dog with this heritage to the family. 

The other aspect of the Corgi personality that you’ll need to watch out for is that they can be a little stubborn. If they don’t want to obey a command, often they won’t so a good deal of consistent training is needed. Add to that the Beagle’s high prey drive, it would be a good idea to keep your Beagi on a leash when out for exercise, which is something they will need a lot of.

Once settled in, the Beagi will develop a strong and loyal bond with the family. They are very sociable, so will not be happy if left alone for long periods. Having somebody around for much of the day, especially if time is available for teaching new tricks and playing, will lead to a much happier and more settled dog.

What will the Beagi look like?

The Corgi has an expressive face with erect ears. The short-haired coat is thick and comes in a wide range of colors. When mixed with the very different appearance of the Beagle, you are likely to meet with considerable variety in the pups.

Both Corgi and Beagle have short, smooth coats that shed seasonally, so this is also likely to be the case with the Beagi too, and you should expect to brush the Beagi two or three times a week as well as regular claw and ear maintenance and the occasional bath.

#8 – Beagle Husky Mix

Beagle Husky  mix

Probably the most energetic mix on the list, the Beagle combined with the Husky makes for a lively, beautiful and friendly crossbreed.

The Husky originates from Siberia where they were bred for work, hauling sleds of goods long distances through snowy conditions, hunting and providing company and protection to man as he toiled in isolated corners of the wilderness.

The Beagle Husky mix could be any combination of the physical traits of the two parents. Weighing up to 60 pounds, he may have a long fluffy tail, blue or brown eyes, a thick coat, erect or floppy ears and his coat could be any combination of colors!

The temperament of the crossbreed could also vary. It will certainly have a lot of energy and will love to run, especially if it spots something to chase – keeping it on a leash is imperative! A good one to two hours of exercise will be needed to keep this breed happy and curb his destructive chewing or irritating howling habits.

Friendly, intelligent and curious, a good program of socialization and training will help to keep this dog on track and help him to channel his intelligence into positive pursuits.

It’s likely that your Beagle Husky mix will live from 10-15 years. He will need a high-quality dog food formulated for high-energy dogs. It would be advisable to regularly check for hip dysplasia, and to screen for it in the parent dogs, as both breeds are susceptible to this painful condition.

Perhaps best left to experienced owners, the Beagle Husky mix makes a wonderful family pet in an active and engaged family where there will be somebody around at home for most of the day. Due to the high energy level, it might not be suitable in a home with very young children. It’s a beautiful mix, and a great companion.

#9 – Beago – Golden Retriever / Beagle Mix

Beago - Golden Retriever Beagle mix

What do you get when you cross two firm family favorite breeds such as the Golden Retriever and the Beagle? You get a match made in heaven, the family favorite, oozing playfulness, intelligence and loyalty – the Beago (or Beagle Retriever).

Likely to have descended from Scotland, the Golden Retriever was a gun dog designed to be able to withstand the harsh conditions of the Scottish Highlands. Dudley Marjoribanks, the designer/breeder, meticulously documented his breeding and the creation of the breed is widely regarded as one of the most successful breeding programs ever.

The Beago will be an intelligent, loyal and family friendly dog with a lot of energy. The main thing to note with this dog is that it will need a lot of exercise and a lot of training to prevent boredom and destructive behaviors. You will be able to train your dog to carry out a range of dog tasks, which will keep him busy, and take part in a range of games and sports.

Anywhere between 13 and 24 inches tall and 20 and 75 pounds in weight, your dog could have a thick, double coat more prone to shedding, or he could have a sleeker coat like a Beagle, or anywhere in between. Your Beago will need brushing at least a couple of times per week, and the more it takes after it’s Retriever parent, the more often you may need to brush.

As both breeds are prone to hypothyroidism, we would advise that the parents are both screened for this disease, and early screening can also prepare you for any other health issues.

#10 – Pitbull Beagle Mix

Pitbull  Beagle mix

The cross between the often misunderstood Pitbull and the chilled-out Beagle is an energetic combination, sometimes known as a Beagle Bull.

The Pitbull was bred for dog sport – they would be set on staked bears or pits full of rats and bets were taken on how well they would do. Thankfully, these cruel sports are no longer accepted, and Pitbulls found work on farms and as companion dogs. Sadly, their violent past still means that many people are worried about this lovely set of breeds.

So how does mixing the Pitbull with a Beagle turn out?

It’s very difficult to predict the appearance of a crossbreed, but it could be anywhere between 13 and 17 inches tall and weigh between 25 and 60 pounds. It could be muscular and powerful like the Pitbull; it could be any color; but it is likely to have floppy ears and a short coat.

Both parent dogs are intelligent, playful and friendly, though they can be quite protective of their family and home. A good routine of regular exercise will be needed to burn off some energy and prevent the dog becoming destructive with chewing and digging behaviors common. 

It’s worth bearing in mind that Pitbulls do not always get on well with other dogs, and can become aggressive in this situation, so care should be taken. In addition, Beagles can be very loud, with a distinctive howl, which could also be expressed in the crossbreed along with a strong prey drive. 

A lot of socialization and training is needed to help prevent some problem behaviors. You’ll need to be patient and consistent, as the Beagle Bull may be stubborn.

Both parent breeds are prone to some health issues which are exacerbated by excessive weight gain, so this should be avoided. Hip dysplasia and cardiac disease are two particular ones to watch out for.

In summary, the Pitbull Beagle cross should make an excellent family pet, but you must take the time to give them the attention they need, as well as for proper socialization, consistent training and a good deal of regular exercise.

Other Beagle Cross Breeds you might consider:

  • Frengle – A French Bulldog and a Beagle – beautiful but prone to Brachycephalic Airway Syndrome due to squashed up face and skull.
  • Beabull – also prone to Brachycephalic Airway syndrome, the cute combination of Beagle and Bulldog should probably be avoided.
  • Puggle – Another combination we would probably avoid is the Pug and the Beagle, again due to the likelihood of Brachycephalic Airway Syndrome.
  • Bolgen Terrier – A mix between the Boston Terrier and a Beagle, this little dog is even tempered and affectionate, but also plagued with breathing difficulties due to the head shape.
  • Doxle – a Dachshund Beagle mix will be a cute and affectionate member of the family, with big floppy ears. However, both parent breeds have long bodies, so the resultant pups are likely to be vulnerable to painful spinal issues as they grow up. 
  • Borkie – a cross between a Yorkshire Terrier and a Beagle brings the laid-back Beagle temperament to the feisty terrier.
  • Peagle – a mix between a little and stubborn Pekingese and a Beagle.
  • Whippet Beagle mix – an active and loving crossbreed with a strong prey drive. Will need to have superb recall before being let off the leash!
  • Beaglier – a mix between a King Charles Spaniel and a Beagle – loyal, affectionate, playful and extremely cute.
  • Meagle – Miniature Pinscher crossed with beagle. Hard working, intelligent and playful.

Wrapping Up: Which Beagle Mix Breed is Right for You?

As you can see, there are a huge number of potential crossbreeds, all containing a mix of playful Beagle charm, combined with features and characteristics from other breeds. Take care to do your research, including all the following:

  • Both breeds that are part of the mix you are looking at
  • The health and temperament of both parents
  • The background of the breeder themselves
  • All the puppies in the litter – every dog is an individual, and in particular in a crossbreed litter, the different puppies may have different combinations of characteristics from both parents. Watch how they interact with one another and check out their attitude and character rather than getting carried away by how cute they are.

Your living situation will be the main component to think about. You need to ensure that if you have children or another dog, the mix that you select will get on well in that situation.

You need to consider how much exercise you are realistically going to do with your dog and choose your mix with that in mind. Whichever breed you opt for, you will need to spend adequate time on  socialization and training, to ensure that your dog is happy and well-adjusted in your home.

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